Home » What I've been up to » Week 16 at the Royal College of Surgeons

Week 16 at the Royal College of Surgeons

Outside of the Royal College of Surgeons. Image taken from http://nobelbiocare-eyearcourse.com/fgdp.html.

Outside of the Royal College of Surgeons. Image taken from http://nobelbiocare-eyearcourse.com/fgdp.html.

There’s not a lot to say about today’s work. The boxes of bones I went through consisted of elements of the arm and shoulder. These included the scapula (shoulder blade), humerus and the individual hand bones.

There wasn’t much to look at with any of the bones, particularly the humerus and scapulars. However there were a lot of them – about 60 of each element! I simply had to count and record each bone as they were all suitable for future teaching materials.

I have made a start on the individual hand bones and got through all of the carpals apart from two, the capitate and trapezoid. I’ve said in previous posts that I haven’t had a lot of experience working with hand bones so it was useful getting a closer look at them one bone at a time. As they were also separated out into their element it was possible to see the extent of general variation that occurs. This variation makes some bones more difficult to side than others, even though there were the same! It was good to get some practice in and I shall be continuing with the hand bones next week.

After volunteering I got to see me sister as she was in London for a meeting/conference. It was really nice seeing her and walking down the Southbank enjoying the sun. I love people watching so it was a great chance to sit down, have a chat and watch the world go by! It’s days like this that I love coming in to London. It’s so full of life and people! I’m so lucky that I get the opportunity to work here. I am definitely relishing it.

Picture taken on Southbank in the sun.

Picture taken on Southbank in the sun.

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One thought on “Week 16 at the Royal College of Surgeons

  1. Pingback: Week 17 Volunteering at the Royal College of Surgeons | Beauty in the Bones

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