Home » Terry Pratchett » The Wit and Wisdom of Discowrld: Interesting Times

The Wit and Wisdom of Discowrld: Interesting Times

Rincewind as illustrated by Paul Kidby in The Art of Discworld. image taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rincewind

Rincewind as illustrated by Paul Kidby in The Art of Discworld. image taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rincewind

I’ve been pretty poor at doing these over the last few weeks but I’m back! And this week I have selected a book at random from Terry Pratchett’s The Wit and Wisdom of Discowrld, complied by Stephen Briggs. I have not personally read this book yet but it sounds like a good one! This book has the hapless wizard Rincewind and his companion/bodyguard Luggage where he finds himself on another adventure trying to get not involved in anything. For a full plot summary visit the Discworld wiki

Now onto the blurb and quotes:

Blurb:

Mighty Battles! Revolution! Death! War! (and his sons Terror and Panic, and Daughter Clancy).

The oldest and most inscrutable empire on the Discworld is in turmoil, brought about by the revolutionary treatise What I Did On My Holidays. Workers are uniting, with nothing to lose but their water buffaloes. War (and Clancy) are spreading throughout the ancient cities.

And all that stands in the way of terrible doom for everyone is: Rincewind the Wizzard, who can’t even spell the word ‘Wizard’…

Cohen the barbarian hero, five foot tall in his surgical sandals who has a lifetime’s experience of not dying…and a very special butterfly.

Quotes

– Many things went on at Unseen University and, regrettably, teaching had to be one of them. The faculty had long ago confronted this fact and had perfected various devices for avoiding it. But this was perfectly all right because, to be fair, so and the students…And therefore education at the University mostly worked by the age-old method of putting a lot of young people in the vicinity of a lot of books and hoping that something would pass from one to the other, while the actual young people put themselves in the vicinity of the inns and taverns for exactly the same reason.

– Cohen’s father had taken him to a mountain top, when he was no more than a lad, and explained to him the hero’s creed and told him that there was no greater joy than to die in battle.

     Cohen had seen the flaw in this straight away, and a lifetime’s experience had reinforced his belief that in fact a greater joy was to kill the other bugger in battle and to end up sitting on a heap of gold higher than your horse.

– The Four Horsemen whose Ride presages the end of the world are known to be Death, War, Famine and Pestilence. But even less significant events have their own Horsemen. For example, the Four Horsemen of the Common Cold are Sniffles, Chesty, Nostril and Lack of Tissues; the Four Horsemen who appearances foreshadows any public holiday are Storm, Gales, Sleet and Contra-flow.

– ‘You sound a very educated man for a barbarian,’ said Rincewind.

    ‘I didn’t start out as a barbarian. I used to be a school teacher. But I decided to give it up and make a living by the sword.

    ‘After being a teacher all your life?’

    ‘It did mean a change of perspective, yes.’

    ‘But…well…surely…the privation, the terrible hazards, the daily risk of death…’

     Mr Saveloy brightened up. ‘Oh, you’ve been a teacher, have you?’

Cohen the Barbarian illustrated by Paul Kidby. Image taken from here.

Cohen the Barbarian illustrated by Paul Kidby. Image taken from here.

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One thought on “The Wit and Wisdom of Discowrld: Interesting Times

  1. Pingback: Around the Archaeology Blogosphere Digest #1 | Doug's Archaeology

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